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Administration should consider extending passing period

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When the bell rings signaling the end of class, everybody shoots out of their seat, gathers their belongings, and rushes towards the halls. In a school bustling with almost 2000 students, it only takes a few seconds for the hallways to become incredibly packed and crowded, and sometimes pushing past the sea of people to reach my next class is an obstacle; trying to squeeze a restroom break in between while still getting to class on time is almost near impossible.

The restrooms fill up quickly with people, some in a line along the mirrors and others waiting for a stall. People go in and out, the line thins, minutes pass, and before I know it, the warning bell has rung and I know I will be late to class (again).

Because of the extremely limited time between classes, the school administrators should consider increasing the passing period. This can be achieved by taking one minute off of every class and adding it onto the passing period. Although shaving off one minute of class time will not drastically affect the subject matter at hand, it can have a lot of positive effects for individual students throughout the school who desperately need an extra minute between classes.

First and foremost, it would help decrease the number of tardies per class, reducing stress for both students and teachers alike. Students would still have to be conscious of their limits, but the added time would allow for more people to stop by the restroom without the constant fear of being late. Along with this, it may also keep students from breaking away from their assignments in the middle of class and wasting precious class time to make the trip to and from the restroom.

With such a tight restriction on time, passing periods are full to the brim with students rushing to get a word in with their friends or go to the bathroom before the bell rings. An extra minute would prove nothing but beneficial to the student body as a whole, with only little sacrifice to class time.

The Waldron Street Journal is written and edited by students of Flour Bluff High School and they are solely responsible for its editorial policy and content. Viewpoints expressed are not necessarily those of other students, faculty, or the administrations or school boards of the Flour Bluff School District.

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Administration should consider extending passing period